The U.S. Census Bureau has announced what states will lose and gain seats in the U.S. House of Representatives.  

Gains

In Florida and Texas, the legislature will draw the lines, and the Governor can veto. Currently, the Republicans control the House, Senate, and Governor in both of these states. Texas will gain 2, and Florida will gain 1 seat in the House of Representatives. Texas will now have 38 seats, and Florida will have 28.

North Carolina will also gain 1 seat. The legislature will draw the lines, and the Governor can veto. Republicans do control the legislature, but the Governor is a Democrat. North Carolina will have 14 Representatives. 

Montana currently only has 1 seat and will now have 2. 

Oregon and Colorado will each gain 1 seat. In Oregon, the democrat-controlled legislature will draw the lines, and the Governor can veto. Oregon will have 6 seats after redistricting. Colorado uses a non-politician commission to draw the lines and will have 8 seats after the election. 

Losses

California and Michigan will both lose a seat and uses a non-politician commission. California will have 52 seats, and Michigan will have 14. 

Illinois will lose 1 seat. The democrat-controlled legislature will draw the lines, and the Governor can veto. Illinois will only have 17 seats after the redistricting. One of the 5 Republicans could lose their seat during the redistricting. 

Ohio and West Virginia both lose a seat. The lines are drawn by the legislature and can be vetoed by the Governor. Currently, the Republicans control the House, Senate, and Governor in both of these states. Ohio will end with 15 seats, and West Virginia will have 2 seats. Currently, democrats only have 3 districts and could easily lose one of those in the redistricting. 

Pennsylvania will lose 1 seat. The republican-controlled legislature will draw the lines, but the democrat Governor can veto. Pennsylvania will only have 17 seats after the redistricting. 

New York will lose one seat. A non-politician commission draws the lines. If the legislature rejects two separate sets of commission-proposed plans, it can amend the commission’s proposals. However, the legislature’s amendments cannot modify the commission’s recommendations by more than 2% of any district’s population.